Selecting and Using Fertilizers

Looking at my lawn and landscape this week, the grass and most shrubs are green and healthy but, I realize that soon, warmer weather will be here bringing with it insect and disease.  Good cultural practices will help minimize damage but when our plants are struggling, often our first thought is to feed it.  It makes sense; when I am feeling ill, brownies always helps me. Continue reading

What is the Difference between Cool Season and Warm Season Vegetables?

Cool season plants grow best with a relatively cool air temperature (50 to 60 °F). These plants are the first ones to be planted in the garden year and then again in the fall. They grow well during the short and cool days of spring and fall. They can be planted several weeks up to a couple of months before the last frost date (around May 10th). Plant cool season crops as soon as the soil is workable in the spring. If planted to late in spring, the heat of summer will reduce their quality. They may become bitter, have lower yields or bolt (form flowers and go to seed).  Light frost will not injure them. Continue reading

The Luna Moth

One of my favorite insects is the Luna Moth. One day last year I had the joy of seeing one on the brick of my home right beside my front door. It actually stayed there resting for a day or two, and then it was gone. Luna moths are usually a rare sight to see. They spend the majority of their time in forests, and are active at night adding to their elusiveness. Another aspect that adds to their elusiveness is their life cycle. The adult stage of a Luna Moth lasts for about a week. During this time they do not eat, because they do not have a proboscis (mouthpart). Continue reading